The last decades can be characterised by increasing globalisation and structural changes in European labour markets. Little is known about the interdependence of those developments and the eventual individual impact of those phenomena. This study aims to relate globalisation, indicated by trade and FDI, to the self-employment rate, which in turn is related to the prevalence of acute myocardial infarction (as an objective indicator of health), addressing a lack of knowledge on this topic in the academic literature. A panel data-variant of the first-difference model is estimated, using unique non-public regional datasets with observations constructed at the NUTS-2 level. A significant and negative relationship between the self-employment rate and the prevalence of acute myocardial infarction mortality has been proved to exist. The relationship between trade and self-employment is insignificant. There is suggestive evidence that the self-employment rate is negatively related to inward FDI stocks

Additional Metadata
Thesis Advisor Bosker, Maarten
Persistent URL hdl.handle.net/2105/38187
Series Economics
Citation
Hennink, Michiel. (2017, July 18). GLOBALISED STRESS? THE IMPACT OF GLOBALISATION ON THE PREVALENCE OF ACUTE MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION THROUGH SELF-EMPLOYMENT. Economics. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2105/38187