This study discusses identity construction and sense of belonging of second-generation (2G) Ghanaian immigrants in the Netherlands because of their experiences in a destination country. The Netherlands has a strong policy on immigration. The immigrants give birth to children or bring their children from country of origin to live with them at an early age. The children, with one or both parent from Ghana, have a way of constructing their identity and sense of belonging whether to a destination country (Netherlands) or country of origin (Ghana). This study draws on semi-structured interviews and participant observation with 17 respondents (15 second-generation children, 2 first-generation parents) in the Netherlands to assess their experiences on how they construct their identity and sense of belonging. My findings have shown their identity is not fixed, and that second-generation construct their identity and sense of belonging based on the experiences they have encountered. Some have accepted parents’ origin and some made their own personal choices of how they perceive themselves. In belonging, they feel the need to belong to The Netherlands, Ghana, and both worlds. Respondents narratives of identity construction and sense of belonging are the result of their connection to the Dutch society and Ghanaian society. The study of identity construction and sense of belonging will further aid discussions on second-generation immigrants experiences and how it informs their choices or decisions.

Additional Metadata
Keywords identity construction, belonging, second generation, acculturation, citizenship, adaptation, transnationalism, Ghana, The Netherlands
Thesis Advisor Biekart, Kees
Persistent URL hdl.handle.net/2105/46582
Series Social Justice Perspectives (SJP)
Citation
Asadu, Patrick Asamoah. (2018, December 17). Identity construction and belonging of second-generation Ghanaian immigrants in the Netherlands.. Social Justice Perspectives (SJP). Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2105/46582