The research paper explores causes and socio-economic consequences of RTAs induced PDs on livelihoods and wellbeing of victims and their families due to livelihood change patterns in Dar. After identification of how the victims and their families develop coping mechanisms and new capabilities the paper analyses the causes of RTAs inducing PDs; why some PDs induced by RTAs end up becoming permanently disabilities, who are mostly affected by RTAs induced PDs and how victims access first-aid and medical treatment after RTAs. The findings show that all road users contribute in one way or another on RTAs inducing PDs because of taking many risks. Through the findings the mostly affected group of people by RTAs inducing PDs is the pedestrians, passengers and motor cyclists especially young males because of nature of their daily activities that expose them to more risks. Victims and their families through the findings suffer from psychological, social and economic aspects. Lack of a special rescue team and inadequate health services are among several factors that have been claimed as contributing to PDs induced by RTAs as well as fatalities that could be avoided. RTAs induced PDs is a burden to the public hospitals and government as a whole due to its economic impact and yet the need to allocate more resources to the prevention and control of RTAs inducing PDs. The study concludes that RTAs induced PDs have adversely affected lives of many people and this area requires more research to better understand the causes and socio-economic consequences.

Additional Metadata
Keywords road traffic accidents, physical disabilities, livelihoods, coping mechanisms, treatment, rehabilitation, poverty, capabilities
Thesis Advisor Cameron, John
Persistent URL hdl.handle.net/2105/8648
Series Development Research (DRES)
Citation
Makuu, Mariana Josephat. (2010, December 17). Causes of road traffic accidents induced physical disabilities and its socio-economic consequences to victims and their families in Dar es Salaam region of Tanzania. Development Research (DRES). Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2105/8648